Prep Time  10minutes
Cook Time  20minutes
Total Time  30minutes

Sauteed Chanterelle Mushrooms Garlic and Thyme

There are a 1000 (actually a lot more) different ways to use mushrooms…and there are dozens or mushrooms available in today’s supermarkets and specialty shops. I use mushrooms as ingredients in my dishes, as stand-alone side dishes and as garnish.  The variety of mushrooms available and the different recipe options let you go in so many different directions.

Chanterelle mushrooms are one of my favorites and in this recipe video, I show you a simple but elegant way to prepare them.  Chanterelle’s are wild mushrooms, that are not always available, so when I see them in the store I usually buy them. They have a beautiful golden color to them, and a have an almost sweet meaty taste.  Below, and demonstrated in the video, is my recipe for sautéed chanterelle mushrooms with garlic and thyme.

Ingredients for Chanterelle Mushrooms with Garlic and Thyme

  • Cup of chanterelle mushrooms chopped into large bit size pieces
  • One clove of garlic
  • Half teaspoon of fresh thyme
  • Olive oil
  • Butter
  • Lemon Juice (optional)
  • Salt and pepper
Recipe Overview & Keys to Success

I like to cook my chanterelle mushrooms to “well done”, where just about all the water in them is fully cooked out and they take on a chewy, “meaty” texture.  If you use high heat and let the chanterelles go long enough, they get nice crispy edges, almost like a chip.

For this dish there’s just a few things to remember.  First it’s important to cut the mushrooms into fairly large pieces as they shrink a lot when cooked; and as you cook them, don’t fiddle with them too much.  Let the chanterelles sear on each side and get nice browned all over.  Finally, anytime you cook with garlic, you want to make sure not to burn it, so add it late in the process, just a few minutes before you’re ready to take the mushrooms off.

Dice the mushrooms
  • Cut the chanterelle mushrooms into 1 – 2 inch pieces; you can watch how I chop mushrooms in this video.
  • Remove any obvious pieces of dirt or debris, but don’t wash them in water, as that can water log the mushrooms
Cooking the chanterelle mushrooms
  • Heat a frying pan and add a tablespoon of olive oil and a tablespoon of butter
  • Add the mushrooms, a couple pinches of salt and pepper and toss to coat
  • NOTE: Mushrooms have a tendency to suck up olive oil.  If at any point the bottom of the pan looks dry, add some additional oil.
  • Let the chanterelles sear on one side, over medium heat (don’t move them around too much) until they are browned (about 10 minutes), then toss the mushrooms in the pan to expose the other side to the heat.
  • Let them continue to brown and notice in the video how dark I let them get.  Eventually they will give up most of their water and be about half the size that you started with.  The edges should be crispy and the texture firm.
  • Add a clove of minced garlic and the fresh thyme leaves and let them cook for a few minutes until the garlic has softened, but not burned
  • If I’m serving as a side, I like to hit the mushrooms with a touch of lemon juice or vinegar at the end for a little acidity
  • Taste and re-adjust the seasoning with salt and pepper if needed

Now that the chanterelle mushrooms are sautéed off, you can take them in a number of directions.  I love them simply served as a side dish, maybe garnished with a bit of chopped parsley.  But you they work in a ton of dishes...here are some of my favorites:

I love cooking these mushrooms with steaks especially.  Here are few of my favorites to pair with them:

Chanterelle Mushroom Recipes (chanterelles can be used in place of the mushrooms on any of these recipes)

Hope you enjoy!! 

Sauteed Chanterelles

Comments (182 )

Reply
huiray
July 30th, 2013 - 9:30am
You said: " Finally, anytime you cook with garlic, you want to make sure not to burn it, so add it late in the process, just a few minutes before you’re ready to take the mushrooms off." This may be true with the chanterelle dish here, but as a general statement adding garlic last is simply NOT TRUE for MANY cuisines and dishes. You must have never eaten nor cooked a Chinese stir-fry. Nor any number of Italian, German, etc etc dishes where the garlic goes in at the beginning and in many cases is allowed to brown.
Yikes...someone got up on the wrong side of the bed. I don't ever want to "burn" my garlic in any dish...and I certainly understand it in context of this dish. We enjoyed it today with some freshly found chantrelles. Thanks!
I'm not quite sure your stance. But I'm hoping that you are on the camp of add the garlic later. I most traditional Mediterranean and Caribbean cuisine, we add the garlic later. This prevents the dry bitter flavor of burnt carbon that most bland people love, and preserves the sensationalism of garlic that most vampires (doucheBags/fatMayonaiseLovingAmericans) hate. No offence America, I love it here; but why do you love mayonnaise instead of flavor? This is a new thing: during the 90's putting mayonnaise on a hamburger was an insult against Canadians; but now it is common pratice? WTF? I actually just realized what "WTF" means, because mayonnaise on a hamburger is complete sh*t, and anyone who likes it can s*ck the d*ck of the queen of Canada (Sarah Palin).
Life is certainly easier when you generalize an entire country, isn't it? It certainly makes justifying a rant go down smoothly. Ignorance truly is bliss, and I hope your little stereotyping exercise gives you that righteous feeling you feel you undoubtedly deserve.
Reply
Confused
July 26th, 2015 - 5:39pm
Sarah Palin is the queen of Canada? She's actually American so I'm not sure how that works out.
Reply
Tom M
September 4th, 2013 - 6:35pm
Whoa, whoa, Hulray, chill. The recipe says "Finally, anytime you cook with garlic, you want to make sure <b>not to burn it,</b> so add it late in the process, just a few minutes before you’re ready to take the mushrooms off." Nota Bene: do not to burn the garlic. In stir frying, the continual movement prevents burning, in this recipe, there is very little "stirring" so the danger of burning the garlic is real. Hence, the advice to add it near the end is not only justified, but close to an imperative.
Obviously you're either retarded or just only eating Chinese food. In almost all Mediterranean (including Italian) and Caribbean food you add the garlic at the end, as to make it not bland, like Chinese food (very bland). P.S. chili does not make your food not bland, just more bland. Chilis are amazing, but nothing takes the place of real spices. CAUTION: spices may create sexual arousal and enhance satisfaction: orally and sexually.
I like the recipe and idea of the thyme, I've been finding pounds of chanterelles for a few weeks in a row now so have been trying new and old recipes for them and enjoying it a lot. A question I have is there some reason why you wouldn't dry sauté the shrooms and add the butter after the natural moisture of the shrooms has cooked off? Just wondering. Thanks for the recipe and I'm looking forward to trying many off your site, it has been added to favorites! Gavin in Tacoma, WA
Lucky you with all the mushroom finds! Have never tried dry frying them...I'll give it a try sometime, but generally I think some kind of fat, in this case butter, helps brown the 'shrooms and prevents them from burning.
FANTASTIC RECIPE! A friend gave me a whole box of chanterelle mushrooms and I'm embarrassed to say that I didn't know a chanterelle mushroom from a shittake mushroom - let alone how to cook them. I found your recipe and made it last night for dinner. Absolutely divine! I made two versions - one was exactly your recipe. For the second version, I made a "mushroom toast" - I whipped up a little garlic aioli, spread it on a slice of whole wheat sourdough bread, and added the mushrooms on top. It turned out to be SO delicious! Thank you for the recipe and cooking instructions. Well done!!!
Reply
Chef Burn
October 12th, 2013 - 6:20am
Thank you. We foraged 1.5 kg of chanterelles yesterday and about 1 kg last week. I have to admit that I had no idea what to do with them. We dried the first lot.... which seems like a waste now as apparently this wrecks the texture, though they might work reconstituted and made into a soup. We tried just frying them, but the results were disappointing because we had not fried them for long enough and they were bitter. After looking at several recipes, I decided to give yours a go because it seemed simple. I am lactose intolerant so I fried the chanties in a combination of sunflower and avocado oil, but otherwise followed your recipe exactly. Delicious!
Sorry, I don't know how it is to live in another state, other than the Golden State (California), but this recipe is bunk in so many ways. 1) those chanterelle mushrooms look like sh*z*t!, but maybe I'm just from California, where ours are awesome. 2) Thyme is beyond unnecessary. 3) Butter, as much as I love it, is the wrong way to go, for sure. Butter is a good way to hide the taste of bad chanterelles. 4) If you're eating them alone, only olive oil and garlic. For the love of god at least 2 cloves of garlic. I mean come on? 5) fifth and most important, according to this video, the "chef" really over cooked these mushrooms, beyond belief!!!!! They should never ever, ever, EVER, EVER have any burnt marks. Please enjoy Chanterelles for their beautiful delicateness, by texture and flavor. Forgive me if I sound smug, I live in the land of plentiful chantrelles (CA). If your's are as terrible enough to cook them the way we have all just seen, don't eat them! There are way better mushrooms for your region: lobster, fire stone, oyster and etc!
You're so fucking lame. People do not use this recipe - you'll waste your great mushrooms.

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